HAVE ANY QUESTIONS? CLICK HERE

CONCIERGE SERVICE

Monday - Sunday
8:00am - 8:00pm

SCHEDULE A VISIT

Tour any of our communities. Click here to get started.

CORPORATE OFFICE

162 College Highway
Southampton, MA 01073

Our Community Blog

Displaying items by tag: senior nutrition

Wednesday, December 16, 2020 12:37

Vitamin D is Critical to Healthy Aging

The winter solstice (Dec. 21st) plays a role in vitamin D deprivation. Often seniors will suffer from bone softening, nausea, cognitive difficulties and frailty. Each of these symptoms can be mistaken for any number of illnesses but could quickly be identified as a lack of Vitamin D by a physician.

The CDC has determined that osteoporosis affects 16% of all seniors. The condition carries serious health risks, potentially leading to falls and other home safety hazards. The clear connection between vitamin D and bone health in the elderly helps defend against bone softening. Vitamin D improves senior mental health, combating prevalent issues like elderly depression. A 2017 study of more than 5,600 older adults found a link between lower levels of vitamin D and depressive symptoms, such as loneliness, lack of enjoyment, and restless sleep.

Study participants with the least amount of vitamin D reported more pronounced mental health concerns. As a result of this emerging science, researchers continue to investigate a potential vitamin D antidepressant.

There are several ways to attain vitamin D benefits:

Sunshine is one of the best natural sources of vitamin D. Take an afternoon walk or invest in a UV lamp for colder months.

  • One tablespoon of cod liver oil supplements 170% of daily vitamin D.
  • Four or five sliced, white mushrooms make up half of the needed vitamin D intake.
  • Three ounces of cooked salmon account for more than 80% of necessary vitamin D.
  • A cup of milk, which is fortified with vitamin D, contains 20% of the daily recommended vitamin D value.

Beyond these natural sources, a doctor or dietitian may recommend a vitamin D supplement, after ruling out medication interactions or other health risks.

Sources:

Madi M, et al. “The association between vitamin D level and periodontal disease in Saudi population, a preliminary study.” 
sciencedirect.com

Yao P, Bennett D, Mafham M, et. al. “Vitamin D and calcium for the prevention of fracture.” 
jamanetwork.com

Kweder H, Eidi H. “Vitamin D deficiency in elderly: Risk factors and drugs impact on vitamin D status.” 
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

aplaceformom.com

 

Published in Nutrition
Sunday, October 20, 2019 16:12

The Impacts of Vitamin D Deficiency

Addressing Vitamin D Deficiency in Later Life?

Could sun dried mushrooms and tank-top shirts be keys to reducing vitamin D deficiencies in later life thus reducing fall risks? Well, yes and let’s discuss why. Vitamin D is often called the sunshine vitamin as it is made from cholesterol in skin and as the sun’s ultraviolet B (UVB) penetrate skin cells it causes production of vitamin D3. 1The dilemma for seniors is that older skin cannot synthesize vitamin D as efficiently while outside activities are often greatly reduced: and, while there are few foods that actually contain vitamin D, older seniors need more vitamin D, approximately 800 IU (international units) daily, as opposed to 600 IU daily for their younger counterparts. 2(According to the Institutes of Medicine, a serum 25 (OH) D level of 25 ng/ml is adequate for most populations while deficiency is defined as less than 20 ng/ml, with insufficiency being less than 30 ng/ml. Through a process called hydroxylation, the liver and kidneys turn stored vitamin D into an active form the body uses.) 

Vitamin D Deficiency is Linked to Poorer Health 

Because older adults are vulnerable to muscle weakness and falls, maintaining sufficient levels of vitamin D is important: there is evidence that sufficient vitamin D levels can strengthen bone and muscles in older adults which leads to reductions in falls3 – the primary benefit of vitamin D is to maintain serum calcium and phosphorus levels within normal ranges to support metabolic function, neuromuscular transmission, and bone mineralization.4 In fact, vitamin D deficiencies are linked to a multitude of health risks. For seniors in later life, vitamin D deficiency has been linked in studies to such conditions as cognitive decline, depression, osteoporosis, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, although there is debate about the strength of the link. 5Vitamin deficient older adults living in areas prone to inadequate exposure to sunlight have increased risk of experiencing cognitive decline. 6Vitamin D deficient older adults may experience a loss of bone density which causes fractures and falls.7 Vitamin D deficient older adults may experience increases of risk factors for cardiovascular disease. 8Vitamin D deficient older adults may experience increases of risk factors for depression and other psychiatric conditions.9

Published in Information
logo2x-big.png

Bringing the Best Solutions
to Seniors in Later Life.

162 College Highway
Southampton, MA 01073
©2022 Everbrook Senior Living. All Rights Reserved.
Website developed by Abacab Designs, LLC.

Search